Navigating the Website

Searching the Archives

Using the Search Prompt

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Searching the archives can be done in many ways but is always done using the prompt on the main screen or the special Google at the bottom of that same main screen.

The system will search the archives using the following:

  • Band/Artist Name
  • Founding Date
  • Ending Date
  • Any Reformation Date
  • RRCA Reference ID
  • Diskery Reference Number
  • Nationality of Origin (Locale)
  • City of Origin (Locale)
  • Genre
  • Words/phrases used in the article itself
You may use any of these to search for an artist.

When you type into the input box and your search matches any of the above criteria then a hit will be recorded. If there is only one hit/entry that matches your request exactly then Diskery will send you directly to the artist page. If there is more than one hit then you will be presented with a menu table where you click on the name of the artist you want. The list is presented to you in alphabetical order, numbers and symbols first. Unlike most other systems, Diskery's design means it wants a direct hit each time, but this is not always possible.

When entering names: You need not enter the entire name, Diskery will search based on whatever you can remember. The search is also not case sensitive, so: "MEGADETH", "Megadeth" and "megadeth" are the same. (Remember you need not use quote marks in the search prompt!).

It is possible to enter scrambled letters into the search box. As long as you have the correct letters and spaces (in any order). Diskery can usually find what you are looking for but if it gets zero results, it tries to re-arrange your letters to see if it can find a hit, if still nothing then it issues a not found message; it does this via the AISE (see separate article on this here in Help). For example: IKSS = KISS but ISK = SISKO ('ISK' being an unscrambled part of the name gets priority). Only names are searched for when unscrambling is attempted.

Because this list can become quite large, you can reduce the search results by providing an exact artist/band name or by using the RRCA ID or more modern Diskery Reference number. Since there can only be one RRCA or Diskery number associated with any artist, the system has no choice but to find the exact match when you use the numbers! To use this feature and ensure that it does not mix up the name of an artist with numbers in their name, see below.

Please note that the 'RRCA ID' is no longer used and left in the system for backward compatibility, artists entered after May 2014 will not have an RRCA number and will yield none found if used!

The "Search Pattern" drop-down menu:

This feature allows you to refine your search by placing pre-programmed additions or restrictions on the Diskery Search Engine:

OptionSearch PatternResultAllows Wildcards
BasicLocation, Dates, Diskery Reference, RRCA Reference, GenreListing or exact matchYES
StandardLocation, Dates, Diskery Reference, RRCA Reference, Genre AND NameThis is the default setting. It may give a listing or exact match. Best for full use of "Wildcard" charactersYES
AdvancedLocation, Dates, Diskery Reference, RRCA Reference, Genre, Artist Name, Contents within the artist articleAlways gives listYES
Exact Name OnlyArtist name onlyAlways exact matchNO
Reference OnlyDiskery Reference Number onlyAlways exact matchNO
Album Date/NameAlbum publication date or nameListing or exact matchYES
Description OnlyArtist ArticleListing or exact matchYES
Genre OnlyGenre typeAlways ListYES
ListDisplays a listing of all artists in the database Always gives list. Ignores anything entered in the search boxNO

When the system responds it may give the response listed in this table or render an error message if there is no way it can make a match on your input.

That's it! But, if you really want to make Diskery earn its keep when you are using it, then read on...

Using the Google Prompt

The Google prompt will search Diskery the way Google does: by crawling through the page text. This prompt is ideal if you have an obscure search you want to make that the Diskery prompt cannot handle; Diskery does not search the article content, but Google does. It is fast, and does a more thorough search of the site. It does have two drawbacks, however: it will not take you directly to a page if only one result is found (it always leaves you on a selection list) unlike the Diskery standard prompt, and it can only find what Google has archived already - latest additions and edits may not appear until Google has come to fetch them at a later time. The Google Search prompt is found at the bottom of every page.

NOTE: Due to the evolution of technology here at Diskery the Google search prompt is being phased out, please consider using the newer search feature listed below.

Advanced Features on Main Search Screen

Using the Wildcard Characters:

The "Search Pattern" drop-down menu is wonderful, but advanced users will find it too simple. For this reason Diskery has 'Wildcard' characters that can be used to open up advanced search features. When used, these characters override the the "Search Pattern" drop-down menu.

To further increase the accuracy of your search, you may choose to use the reserved 'Wildcard' characters. These symbols are inserted in the search box along with your search pattern and serve to modify the search by changing how Diskery uses the database. To use them, leave the "Search Pattern" drop-down menu to the needed setting in the above table and then add them into your search pattern.

! - Exclamation

Forces Diskery to search the artist names in the database using an EXACT MATCH. You will not get a list but will either get the artist displayed directly on your screen or an error if they are not found. It is an all-or-nothing search.


If there is only one completely unique version of the name in the database (no variation or where the letter sequence of the name appears elsewhere) you will be taken directly to the artist, as in 'Megadeth' without the need to add the exclamations.

The symbol MUST be the first character entered.

? - Question Mark

Use this character to say to Diskery "including an unknown character".

Returns all entries with 'S' at the start and 'R' somewhere else that are at least 4 characters long.

The '?' can be used anywhere and as often as you like. If you enter them at the very end of your input the trailing ones will be removed (not needed/assumed).

* - Asterisk (star)

Use this character to say to Diskery "what I typed and anything else".


Returns all entries with 'Slayer' at the end or at the beginning or (last example) sandwiched between other text.

If you enter them at the very end of your input the trailing ones will be removed (not needed/assumed).

(NOTE: This variation is no longer needed and left for operators who still use it. Simply typing the search item will automatically assume this behavior.)


This example will return anything with the letters 'S' and 'L' together followed by other random characters until it finds an 'r' and any characters there-after. The search engine would return names such as:

SA Slayer
Satanic Slaughter

The asterisk and question mark can be used together.

Using the Asterisk (star - *) directly

For compatibility to those of us who are old-school computer operators from days gone by - the asterisk has an exception. It can be used in the search box all alone. By entering it '*' all by itself (no quote marks), Diskery will regurgitate its entire database - list every entry in it. Likewise if you enter '*.*' for us old school CP/M, Unix and DOS gurus. They must be entered alone in the search box.




Lists all entries in the database. The '*.*' or '*' must be used alone. Leaving the search box empty or typing the word 'ALL' has the same result.


The word 'ALL' is a reserved wildcard and serves the same purpose as using the asterisk alone.


Entering nothing at the search prompt makes Diskery list all entries in the database.


Entering a '#' as the first character in your search string will force Diskery to search ONLY by catalog numbers (both modern Diskery and old RRCA). So, for example: '#62' will result in a direct link to file number 62 (Dark Funeral); #ERF00095 will give the same result. The '#' MUST be the first character!


Will preset the file for the band Dark Funeral.

Random Artist Button:

If you select the "RANDOM ARTIST" button then you need not select any other option or fill out the search prompt, a random artist by ID number will be chosen for you and you will be taken directly to that artist's page.

Searching Dates:

You will get a list of choices, but you can search for artists by dates. So if you want bands formed, ended or reformed in 1995, you can enter '1995' into the search box. You could also enter '1995-2005' but this will give you a very exact search for bands who formed and ended on those exact dates... date search tends to be exact.

When typing into the search box:

  • Use only Roman/English lettering (the basic 26 letter alphabet and numbers) as it does not recognize accent marks and extended characters.
  • In the case of punctuation, it will allow such text only if it is a part of the band's name (such as use of the single quote mark ('), and the period/dot (.). Although ampersand (&) is permitted it is not used in band names to avoid software incompatibilities that occur with certain search patterns, so 'and' is used instead. The 'Wildcard' characters ( !, ? and * ) mentioned earlier are reserved for that purpose and cannot be used directly as a part of a name. The word 'ALL' is also reserved.
  • It also will restrict (deliberately censor) certain words for purposes of securing the database against rogue programmers or robotic programs. The system will not tell you if it does not recognize certain characters or words and simply responds that it did not find what you were looking for.
  • Artists which use abbreviations as a part of their names, such as "D.O.A." the dots will be removed because most humans don't think to use them, use "DOA" instead.
When entering national names the Database will list bands under one type, so 'England' and 'UK' will be 'UK', as will 'USA', will be used instead of 'United States' and 'United States of America'.


  • The short form for nation names is currently being implemented into the database as entries are discovered and may not work correct until that time. If searching for nations where abbreviations are used, best to check all combinations of that name.
  • The RRCA ID option is being phased out as a apart of an older database routine. New bands entered in to the database will no longer be issued this number so it will not work on entries entered after 2014.

File record #: 21

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