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Boston

T

om Scholz was the brain that founded the ballad and synth. laden Boston operation in 1975 and set it up the basement of his Boston, Mass. home studio. Part Pop and part Hard Rock, Boston was discovered on the power of some homemade demos, allowing him to sign to 'Epic' and collect a group of musician friends including Brad Delp (vocals/guitar), Barry Goudreau (guitar), Fran Sheehan (bass) and Sib Hashian (drums) to form a band proper.

As a group they quickly went to work constructing what would become the ultimate '70s AOR track More Than A Feeling; an immediate success on Christmas of 1976. With flawless harmony that would float then drop into a softened twin guitar attack, the song paved the way for their debut album release. The self-titled album went to #3 in the U.S. and 11 in the U.K., spending 2 years on the U.S. charts and sold 10 million copies along the way; in-fact it would be the largest debut in history. Although the rest of the record contained well-written material (if you ignore the clich├ęs contained within), none of the remaining tracks were as impressive as the first.

Inevitably the pressure was on to record a follow-up and soon. The resulting Don't Look Back (1978) was a musically excellent album but it didn't lend itself to repeated listening; their formula from the first was repeated almost note-for-note and was tiring fast and charted mostly as a result of it's elder brother's success, gaining a 1 in the U.S. and a 9 in the U.K. Sholz was disappointed with the lower sales (still in the millions though), and about how the album was released prematurely. He was partially right in his thoughts for the timing of this release was bad, with it being released right in the middle of the Punk explosion; cover art depicting space faring guitars and all. Needless to say it was not the fashion of the day.

During the next seven years they would have a legal battle with 'CBS' while signing to 'MCA'. Sholz would also become an inventor by creating the "Rockman", a device that amplified electric guitar sounds at low volume for home recording. Although not official the problems held them up in limbo and the band had basically split up.

Third Stage was shelved during the band's split but would finally emerge in 1986 sans Gordreau, who left to form his own outfit Orion with Gary Phil taking his place and Jim Masdea returning to replace Sib Hashian. This third outing featuring reliable melodic Rock songs and airbrushed space scenes on the cover was once again a carbon copy of the previous offerings. The track Amanda reached number 1 in the U.S. singles chart with the album achieving the same, in addition to selling millions of units. Yet again, however, the Boston formula got tired quickly and after another extended layover they released Walk On in 1994. This time they fared less lucky for the fan's patience had worn thin. It received only a 51 chart position, far less then the predecessors. They split shortly after, leaving their mark in Rock music history several times over by selling over 20 million units, and having a hit debut followed by three consecutive number 1 albums; a feat never before achieved.

With a new line-up and a massive delay with intermittent performances, Boston would release two more studio albums, Corporate America (2002) and Life, Love & Hope (2013).


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Nation USA
City Boston, Massachusetts
Promotional Address Unknown
Genre Hard Rock
Formations/Versions 1
Web Unknown
Active Years 1975-1995
E-Mail Unknown
Old RRCA File Code REV00112
New Reference Code 320