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Thin Lizzy

(Redirected from: Phil Lynott)

T

he legendary act Thin Lizzy was founded in Dublin, Ireland in 1969 by Phil Lynott (ex-Skid Row (Ireland)/ex-Orphanage; vocals/bass), and Brian Downey (ex-Orphanage; drums) together with Eric Bell (ex-Dreams; guitar/vocals) and Eric Wrixon (keyboards; who left after the first 45 single). After the first single on 'Parlophone', the group relocated to London in late 1970 at the behest of their managers with a fresh ‘Decca' issued contract in their hands.

Their debut albums Thin Lizzy (1971) and Shades Of A Blue Orphanage (1972) came and went without much notice, even though they managed a one-off hit for Whiskey In The Jar making a U.K. 6; most likely this feat was pulled off by merging modern hard rocking guitar with the traditional Irish folk lyrics (it was an Irish folk song). The Rocker was another track of note for the more hard-edged follow-up album Vegabonds Of The Western World (1973), an album that still failed to capture the song's success. At this time Bell chose to leave to be replaced by ex-Skid Row (USA) axe man Gary Moore. But Moore would leave shortly later before the subsequent tour and later joined Colosseum II, to be replaced with John Cann (ex-Atomic Rooster/ex-Bullitt; guitar) and Andy Gee (ex-Ellis; guitar), giving the act a twin guitar sound. But after the tour, they too would soon be replaced by the more permanent arrangement of Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson respectively.

With all these changes it still didn't spell success for after singing a new deal with 'Virtigo' and releasing Nightlife (1974) and Fighting (1975) they were still struggling on the charts with the latter giving them only a U.K. 60. But 1976's Jailbreak was another matter, their live shows, along with the massive success of Boys Are Back In Town, coupled with the album being the most consistent of their career, it managed to become a transatlantic smash hit getting a 10 U.K. and their first U.S. listing at 18, the hit track alone making 18 in the U.K.

Several other tracks managed to muscle their way into the charts as well until Johnny The Fox was released later that same year. This album lacked the continuity with its predecessor but was nonetheless a hit at 11 U.K./52 U.S. and boasted the visceral Hard Rock track Don't Believe A Word. This was the album that set Thin Lizzy above the pack as something more than a basic proto-Metal act. This is also where Lynott took on some extra curricular activities in the form of The Damned's Rat Scabies, as well as ex-Sex Pistols', Paul Cook and Steve Jones (as The Greedies on the 1980 Christmas single A Merry Jingle). To cash in on the success and introduce the new fans to the old content, the 1976 "Best of…" compilation Remembering - Part 1 would be released.

Except for the 1977 Reading Festival where he was back in full form, Moore temporarily replaced Robertson when Robertson injured his hand in a fight. Bad Reputation was released the following month furnished with the hit track Dancing In The Moonlight making a 14 U.K. on its own while the album managed 4 U.K./39 U.S. Thin Lizzy had made their name through live shows and in 1978 they finally recorded that experience on Live And Dangerous, a record that many critics claim as one of the best live albums in Rock history. The subsequent tour saw Robertson leave to form Wild Horses with Moore now holding down both spots, while Mark Nauseef took over for the absent Downey.

The 1979 set Black Rose (A Rock Legend) was just that, the last legendary album for Thin Lizzy. It mixed all-out Rockers alongside more traditional material and managed two more U.K. hit tracks-gone-single, Do Anything You Want To Do, and the tribute to Lynott's baby daughter Sarah. Moore, on the other hand, was enjoying solo success as guest vocalist on Parisienne Walkways. But within the year Moore would be out of Thin Lizzy with Lynott replacing him, with another Scotsman by the name of Midge Ure to fulfill touring obligations, but when he departed to front Ultravox, Lynott replaced him with ex-Pink Floyd man Snowy White. During this time a "best of..." compilation, The Continuing Saga Of The Aging Orphans,was completed in 1979.

1980 saw Lynott marrying Caroline Crowther (daughter of Leslie) and releasing his own solo set Solo In Soho. The album made U.K top 30 but it failed to sell well over-all. One track contained within, Yellow Pearl, would become the theme for the TV show Top Of The Pops. But later that year Thin Lizzy would release Chinatown, the title track granting them another hit at U.K. 21 with the album as a whole making 7, and a follow-up album, Renegade, following in 1981 making only 38 on the same charts. It was clear their popularity was starting to wane and after a line-up shift seeing John Skyes (ex-Tygers Of Pan Tang; guitar) replace Gorham, and Darren Wharton replace Snowy White on keyboards so he could rejoin Pink Floyd, they released the slight comeback release Thunder And Lightening (1983) making them a U.K. 4. It was too little too late, however, as it proved to be their swansong; the band splitting shortly before the release of the 29 U.K. charting live album titled simply Live in 1983.

Downey and Lynott moved on to form the short-lived Grand Slam before Lynott resumed his solo career in 1985 after settling personal differences with Moore. His second album, the 1982 The Phil Lynott Album was already released, and with the help of Moore he would release the top 5 U.K. hit album Out In The Fields. Although that album was not a part of his official discography (being a collaboration and not a solo), the single 19 was, as was King's Call, released posthumously after his death in January of 1986 from a drug overdose.


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Nation Ireland
City Dublin
Promotional Address Unknown
Genre Hard Rock
Formations/Versions 1
Web Unknown
Active Years 1969-1983
E-Mail Unknown
Old RRCA File Code UC000272
New Reference Code 725

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See also these artists mentioned in this article:

Tygers Of Pan Tang Sex Pistols The Damned
Skid Row (Ireland) Pink Floyd